west

New Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea (PNG), James Marape visions to make his country “the richest black Christian nation on earth” [#JamesMarape #PapuaNewGuinea #ChristianNation]

The new Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea (PNG) recently elaborated on his vision to make his country “the richest black Christian nation on earth” through a combination of fairer resource deals with transnational corporations and a renewed focus on the agricultural sector, but the success of his ambitious plans will largely rest on his ability to “balance” between the West and China, as well as making unprecedented progress on the socio-economic development of the mostly tribal hinterland.

The new Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea (PNG) only entered office a few months ago after a long-running political scandal led to the resignation of his predecessor but he is already making waves with his ambitious vision of turning this resource-rich but poverty-stricken island country into “the richest black Christian nation on earth”.

James Marape made his Trump-like nationalist proclamation in late July 2019 during his visit to Australia, which was his first foreign trip since assuming his position, where he also spoke about his plan of one day “participating with Australia looking after smaller island nations”.

James Marape aims to achieve this through a combination of fairer resource deals with transnational corporations and a renewed focus on the agricultural sector, but the success of his vision will largely rest on his ability to “balance” between the West and China, as well as making unprecedented progress on the socio-economic development of the mostly tribal hinterland.

Papua New Guinea New Leader James Marape’s Ambitious Vision:
Global Research

West Dublin Alliance, neighborhood group, files suit in Alameda County Superior Court against Valley Christian Center of Dublin in California and the city of Dublin over too much noise

A group of residents concerned that a new sports complex attached to a Christian center and school could create too much noise for their neighborhood is suing the center and the city.

“We’re not against sports, or the church. Their education system has done well for the city. We savor our 31 years of quietness.”
– sShirley Lewandowski, who has lived nearby for decades

West Dublin Alliance, a neighborhood group, filed the suit earlier this year in Alameda County Superior Court against Valley Christian Center of Dublin in California and the city of Dublin itself.

The lawsuit alleges that the city did not properly study the noise impacts from a proposed 600-seat athletic field to be used for sports such as football and track.

The project would also include a concession stand, ticket booth and a plaza, amphitheater and other landscaping.

Community group sues Christian school over potential noise:
East Bay Times

A church in Niger was set on fire by Muslims protesting the arrest of a local imam who was critical of proposed legislation to regulate religion.

The Assembly of God church in the Zaria district of Maradi, the West African country’s third largest city, was torched by protesters on the night of June 15 and continued through the next day.

In addition to the church, the pastor’s car was also torched.

The incident occurred after the arrest of Sheikh Rayadoune, an imam at the Zaria mosque.

Rayadoune’s arrest happened on June 15, 2019 after he criticized a proposed measure that he believed would impose regulations on worship during his Friday prayer services.

Christian church set on fire by Muslim rioters in Niger after imam’s arrest:
Christian Post

Until this week, Rebecca Sharibu had never set foot outside of her village in northern Nigeria. Helpless and heartbroken, she boarded a plane for the very first time and traveled 9,000 miles to the United States on a desperate mission to secure the freedom of her young daughter.

Leah Sharibu, 16, was kidnapped in February 2018 in a raid at her school by Boko Haram—a deadly Nigerian terror group with ties to ISIS. In all, the group abducted 110 girls.

One month later, the Nigerian government negotiated the release of every hostage with one exception: Leah, who was 14 years old at the time she was taken captive.

Boko Haram would not let her go unless she renounced her Christian faith and converted to Islam. Leah refused and was declared a “slave for life” by her captors.

“She chose faith over freedom when it would have been so easy to cave.”
– Dede Laugesen, executive director of Save the Persecuted Christians, a grassroots group that raises awareness of worldwide Christian persecution.

Rebecca endured 6 long months without any word about the wellbeing of her daughter, unaware whether she was dead or alive. In August 2018, Boko Haram released a photo of Leah clad in a hijab along with a recording in which Leah can be heard pleading for her freedom.

“Immediately [when] I saw it, I just started crying and weeping. On a daily basis, I am pained. I weep. I don’t feel good, but I have no choice.”
– Rebecca recounting the first time she saw Leah’s photograph.

Rebecca is not alone.

Tears flow throughout the west African nation. About 2,000 Nigerians died last year in ongoing disputes portrayed by the media as a clash between farmers and herdsmen.

“We’re here to let the world know what’s happening, because they keep this narrative of herder-farmer conflict. It’s not that way at all.”
– Alheri Magaji, whose father was arrested and detained for 100 days. A village elder, he was removed from power during a Fulani militant raid.

Magaji equates what’s happening to a deadly religious campaign with the goal of eradicating Christians.

“A bill was just passed by the National House of Assembly saying that preachers are going to be regulated and their licenses renewed every year. We believe Kaduna State is a testing ground for what plans they have in Nigeria as a whole.”
– Alheri Magaji

Magaji and others like Mercy Maisamari represent a younger generation of Nigerian Christians unafraid to speak out, even though it comes with great risk to their own lives now that Fulani Muslims have run the local, state, and federal government apparatus.

Save the Persecuted Christians and the International Committee on Nigeria organized a delegation of Nigerians to travel to Washington, D.C. to share their stories with leaders at the White House and Capitol Hill.

“Someone has to say what is really happening. If God says it’s you, then you can’t run away from the responsibility of being the one to talk.”
– Mercy Maisamari, who was kidnapped by Fulani militants and held hostage for 10 days.

“This really is a jihad that is raging in Nigeria and we are ramping up to a genocide.”
– Dede Laugesen

Leah has celebrated 2 birthdays while in captivity. Her brave stand is encouraging others like Gloria Puldu, who runs the eponymous Leah Foundation – a group dedicated to secure freedom for Leah and other girls like her.

Puldu’s vocal advocacy in the U.S. has caught the attention of Nigerian officials, who visited the local office of the foundation and informed staff they would like question her when she returns.

“As a Christian I’m not afraid. I want to stand for my faith, on behalf of my people.”
– Gloria Puldu

Tony Perkins of The Family Research Council has chosen Leah Sharibu as the cause he will personally champion as the newly-elected chair of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.

Still, it is perhaps the biggest understatement to suggest the courage of Leah affects no one more than her own mother – who’s lifeless face reflects a pain no parent should ever bear.

“She did an amazing thing by refusing to renounce Christ, and I’m very proud of what she has done. I’m not sure if I was even in her position at 14 years old that I would have even done what she has done.”
– Rebecca Sharibu

Pain and prayer now fuel Rebecca’s passion, prompting the boldness to ask for help from any and all who will listen.

“I have come to plead with your government—to plead with Pres. Donald Trump. My son’s name is Donald. So Donald Trump I need him to help me have my daughter released. Leah needs to be home like the other girls who are back with their families.”
– Rebecca Sharibu

Christian Teen’s Contagious Courageous Stand, a ‘Hostage for Life’ for Refusing to Deny Jesus:
CBN News

Suspected Muslim Fulani herdsmen ambushed and killed a 26-year-old Catholic on Thursday, May 2, 2019 in north-central Nigeria and two other Christians in the same manner on April 27, 2019.

After a herdsmen assault in March 2018 that left 27 Christians dead in the predominantly Christian community of Dong village north of Jos in Nigeria, assailants on Thursday, May 2, 2019 killed David Musa, 26, at 5:25 p.m., said Nuhu Ako, 42-year-old Christian youth leader at the area’s St. Monica’s Catholic Church.

“We heard the sound of gunshots around the stream west of Dong village…We rushed there to find out what happened and found again the killing of a member of our community.”
– Nuhu Ako

Three Christians Killed in Ambush Attacks near Jos, Nigeria
Morning Star News